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IF YOU ARE A U.S. CITIZEN YOU HAVE LOST ALL YOUR CONSTITUTIONAL RIGHTS
January 19, 2012, 11:18 pm
Filed under: small news

The National Defense Authorization Act

 

(NDAA) for Fiscal Year 2012

 

was signed into United States law

 

 on December 31, 2011

 

 by President Barack Obama

 

 

NATIONAL DEFENSE AUTHORIZATION ACT ALLOWS MILITARY TO DETAIN U.S. CITIZENS FOR LIFE WITHOUT ACCESS TO A TRIAL OR ATTORNEY

 

National Defense Authorization Act (FY 2012) 

Anderson Cooper, Brian Williams, Rachel Maddow, Bill O’Reilly, Sean Hannity, Neil Cavuto and the other handful of household names that mainstream America relies on for news should be talking about this non-stop.

 

BUT THEY DON’T MENTION IT

 

This is definitely one of the SECRETS, America is changing fast and they don’t want you to know anything about it.

The Media’s Blackout Of The National Defense Authorization Act Is Shameful

 

The broadcast media’s ignorance and unwillingness to cover the National Defense Authorization Act, a radical piece of legislation which outrageously redefines the US homeland as a “battlefield” and makes US citizens subject to military apprehension and detainment for life without access to a trial or attorney, is unacceptable. 

Guys, this is far more important than Penn State’s Disgusting Creep of the Decade, or even Conrad Murray’s sentencing.

Call it what you will: a military junta, a secret invalidation of Americans’ civil rights, a Congress gone mad. Whatever it is, it needs to be covered by the press, and quickly.

THIS WAS PASSED INTO LAW———- THIS SPELLS TROUBLE

The National Defense Authorization Act (NDAA) for Fiscal Year 2012[1] was signed into United States law on December 31, 2011 by President Barack Obama.[2][3]

The Act authorizes $662 billion[4] in funding, among other things “for the defense of the United States and its interests abroad.” In a signing statement, President Obama described the Act as addressing national security programs, Department of Defense health care costs, counter-terrorism within the U.S. and abroad, and military modernization.[5][6] The Act also imposes new economic sanctions against Iran (section 1045), commissions reviews of the military capabilities of countries such as Iran, China, and Russia,[7] and refocuses the strategic goals of NATO towards energy security.[8]

The most controversial provisions to receive wide attention are contained in Title X, Subtitle D, entitled “Counter-Terrorism.” In particular, sub-sections 1021 and 1022, which deal with detention of persons the government suspects of involvement in terrorism, have generated controversy as to their legal meaning and their potential implications for abuse of Presidential authority. Although the White House[9] and Senate sponsors[10] maintain that the Authorization for Use of Military Force (AUMF) already grants presidential authority for indefinite detention, the Act states that Congress “affirms” this authority and makes specific provisions as to the exercise of that authority.[11][12] The detention provisions of the Act have received critical attention by, among others, the American Civil Liberties Union (ACLU) and some media sources which are concerned about the scope of the President’s authority, including contentions that those whom they claim may be held indefinitely could include U.S. citizens arrested on American soil, including arrests by members of the Armed Forces.

 

ndefinite detention without trial: Section 1021

 

 

Detainees upon arrival at Camp X-Ray, January 2002. In May 2006, the UN Committee against Torture condemned prisoners’ treatment at Guantánamo Bay, noting that indefinite detention constitutes per se a violation of the UN Convention Against Torture.

Pursuant to the AUMF passed in the immediate aftermath of the September 11, 2001 attacks, the NDAA text affirms the President’s authority to detain, via the Armed Forces, any person “who was part of or substantially supported al-Qaeda, the Taliban, or associated forces that are engaged in hostilities against the United States or its coalition partners,” and anyone who commits a “belligerent act” against the U.S. or its coalition allies, under the law of war, “without trial, until the end of the hostilities authorized by the [AUMF].” The text authorizes trial by military tribunal, or “transfer to the custody or control of the person’s country of origin,” or transfer to “any other foreign country, or any other foreign entity.”[18] An amendment to the Act that would have explicitly forbidden the indefinite detention without trial of American citizens was rejected by the Senate.[19]

Addressing previous conflict with the Obama Administration regarding the wording of the Senate text, the Senate-House compromise text, in sub-section 1021(d), also affirms that nothing in the Act “is intended to limit or expand the authority of the President or the scope of the Authorization for Use of Military Force.” The final version of the bill also provides, in sub-section(e), that “Nothing in this section shall be construed to affect existing law or authorities relating to the detention of United States citizens, lawful resident aliens of the United States, or any other persons who are captured or arrested in the United States.” As reflected in Senate debate over the bill, there is a great deal of controversy over the status of existing law.[20].

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/National_Defense_Authorization_Act_for_Fiscal_Year_2012

 

FORGET ABOUT YOUR RIGHTS IN AMERICA

THEY HAVE JUST BEEN TRASHED

 

 

Read more: http://articles.businessinsider.com/2011-12-01/politics/30462154_1_drone-strikes-civil-rights-military-junta#ixzz1jwoynubb

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