Godssecret's Weblog


Mount Zion- HIGH ENERGY

UPDATED June 16 2016

The mitzvah to appoint a King is not necessarily agreed upon. There is an argument in the Talmud Sanhedrin 20b regarding the verses of the Torah that discuss the Jewish king. The Torah plainly says (Devarim 17:14): “When you come to the land that Hashem your God is giving you, you will inherit it and settle in it and you will say: I shell appoint a king over myself … Then indeed you should appoint a king over yourself …” The language of the Torah seems obscure. Is it trying to tell us that the monarchy is not the ideal system of government, but Hashem allows it if the people will demand it? Or is it trying to say that indeed there is a mitzvah to appoint a Jewish king at some point in our history? In fact both explanations are found in the Talmud. The Talmud leaves this dispute undecided. The Rambam  holds that appointing the king is a mitzvah. Rabbi Abarabanel (Devarim 17:14) holds that it’s not. The  Ramban (Devarim 17:14) explains that the Torah obscure language here without clearly stating if it commendable to appoint a king or that simply this is what would happen in the future.

400 years after we entered the land of Israel the Jewish people asked Shmuel, the greatest prophet of the time, that a king should be appointed. Shmuel was very upset at their request and kept warning them that the kingship they are asking will one day turn against them.

The lineage of King David is shrouded in mysteries, Here is a little revealed :David’s  Great Grandmother was a convert from Moab, Moab is the nation known for exceptional cruelty and moral degradation carried all the way from Lot and his daughters. The Vilna goan says that this kind of cruelty is a quality needed for a Jewish King.  The Torah forbids a Moabite convert to intermix with our nation, but this prohibition was limited to men, though its not written as such in the Torah explicitly. For generations there were no Moabite converts, the details of this law were forgotten and when Ruth came with Naomi, many thought that she was forbidden to marry a regular Jew.. Boaz however, knew the truth and issued his halachic ruling: Saying that Ruth is permissible to the Jewish Congregation. There was a closer relative than Boaz who could choose to marry Ruth but that relative refused, as he did not accept the ruling Boaz had made. He though a Jew could not marry a Moabite convert, even a female one. She became pregnant on the wedding night, but Boaz died right after. Some thought that his death was Divine retribution for marrying a Moabite convert, but in truth it was exactly the opposite – Hashem let Boaz live till this time only in order that the next generation of David’s ancestors will be born.

Boaz’s grandson Yishai was one of the leaders of the generation. At the end of his life he started doubting the halachic decision of his grandfather. What if Boaz was wrong? Then the entire family would be considered “Psulei Kahal”  (those unfit to marry regular Jewish people) There is one way to purify such families ( Kidushin 69a). The man can take a servant woman and her children are halachically like herself. If they are freed, they can marry anyone. But what if Boaz was right? Then Yishai is regular Jew and can’t have relations with a servant woman. So Yishai came up with an ingenious solution..

He separated from his wife, and freed his servant woman on condition that he is a kosher Jew. This way, if Yishai is kosher, his relations with the servant woman are permitted since she was freed, and has become Jewish. But if Yishai is not kosher, then he is having relations with a servant woman, whose children will not bear a stigma of “Psulei Kahal”. This way Yishai could purify his seed and have kosher descendants no matter what.

When Yishai’s wife found out about this, she did not accept such a decision. She was confident that Boaz, the leader of his generation, could not be mistaken. She Knew her husband was a kosher Jew. She therefore pretended to be the servant woman, and went to her husband in the dark.. When his wife was noticeably pregnant, Yishai, of course, assumed that this is an illegitimate child. Later, when Shmuel came to anoint one of Yishai’s children, it did not even occur to Yishai to bring Dovid. It was only when Shmuel received a message from Hashem that neither of the men standing before him is the chosen one, was Dovid called in. And here the TRUTH came out at last. The man that was most despised is the true anointed of Hashem. It’s the broken heart that Hashem desires (Tehilim 51:19).

David was the fourteenth generation after Avraham, so 14 is the “Gematria” of his name, David. His kingdom is compared to the moon. The moon shines its’ brightest on the fifteenth day of the lunar month, but by the end of the day its’ light begins to wane. So too Shlomo, David’s son, reached the highest point of the dynasty, but at the end of his life things started to deteriorate (see Melachim 1:11:4). In another fifteen generations the Temple was destroyed and our nation went into exile. Every month, when we sanctify the new moon we say that our nation will be renewed just like the new moon! And as we wait for Moshiach to speedily arrive, we continue: “David, the King of Israel lives forever!”


court-yard

Jews have been praying at this site King David’s tomb on Mount Zion since the Middle Ages (12th century). david ancient-well-cover-2100-years-old Ancient well cover on Mount Zion 2100 + years old davidtomb2s marker phjerusalemmountzion1 phjerusalemmountzion2 phjerusalemmountzion6 tom BEHIND THIS ANCIENT STONE MARKING THE GRAVE OF KING DAVID ARE SEALED STAIRS THAT GO DOWN TO THE BURIAL CAVES OF THE BIBLICAL KINGS OF THE HOUSE OF DAVID ! The Midrash, counting Abraham as the first Jewish King counts 14 kings between him and King Solomon, and another 14 kings from King Solomon to the destruction of the First Temple. King Solomon is the 15th of 30 kings. These 30 kings correspond to the 30 days of a lunar month, and thus the institution of Jewish monarchy is seen as starting as a “ moon” with Abraham, waxing until its greatest point in the person of King Solomon, and then waning as Jewish civilization became more decadent after him, until the destruction. Now more on king David and Mount Zion. Mount Zion is a hill just outside the walls of the Old City of Jerusalem. The term “Zion” became a synonym referring to the entire city of Jerusalem and the Land of Israel. There is reason to believe that in Biblical times the name Mount Zion referred to the area of what today is called the Temple Mount. However, as early as the first century the hill today called Mount Zion had acquired the name for unknown reasons. On Mount Zion is King David’s Tomb and that of the other kings of Isreal. An unexpected opportunity to investigate this building occured in 1948, during Israel’s War of Independence. A mortar shell hit the site, and Israeli archaeologist Jacob Pinkerfeld was sent to repair the damage. In the course of repairs, he removed the marble floor slabs and dug two pits revealing three earlier floors, shown in the lower left drawing. Five inches below the present floor was a 12th-century Crusader floor; 1.5 feet below that, Pinkerfeld discovered a mosaic floor with geometric designs dating to the Byzantine period (fifth century); 4 inches below the mosaic, he uncovered the remains of a Roman floor (end of the first century), consisting of plaster fragments and stones from a possible pavement. A foundation ledge projecting into the hall at this final level indicated that this earlier Roman floor was the original building’s floor. Pinkerfeld observed that the niche in the northern wall, behind the cenotaph, was Part of the original construction Standing 6 feet above the earliest floor Level, the niche resembles other niches in ancient synagogues. He noted that the niche was oriented towards the Temple Mount and concluded that the building was originally a synagogue and the niche was the aron (ark for Torah scrolls).Pinkerfeld concluded that the original building was a Roman-period synagogue or early Byzantine. . The thousand-year-old building that houses the Tomb of King David on Mount Zion in Jerusalem is almost always thronging; some have come to pray and pay homage to Israel’s famous king and ancestor of the Messiah, while others pour over sacred texts all day long in the anteroom next to the tomb. Jewish tradition has identified the tomb of King David on “Mount Zion”, a few hundred meters from the Zion Gate for more than one thousand years. The earliest mention of the Tomb of David as identified today appears in the writings of the Moslem geographer al-Makadasi, in the 10th century. However, al-Makadasi based this identification on the tradition of “the People of the Book”, that is, Jews and Christians. The first Jewish source to commit this tradition to writing is the travel diary of the “Jewish Marco Polo”, Binyamin of Tudela [1160 – 1173]. He writes Two Jewish workers employed to reconstruct a damaged monument on Mount Zion accidentally happened upon a secret passage andfound themselves in a palace made of marble columns.Within the palace was a table upon which rested a golden scepter and golden crown, with riches all around. The workers decided this was King David’s Tomb. Suddenly, they were struck down by a fierce wind and heard voices that told them to leave immediately. Three days later, the two workmen were sick in bed and could not be persuaded to return to the site. The tomb itself is a burial cave, which is not accessible. What is accessible is a cenotaph (stone marker) over the entrance to the cave. The cenotaph is located within a complex of buildings which date to the Crusader Period [12th century], though some of the buildings were added during the Ottoman Period [16th century and later], and may have served as a caravanserai (inn for traders on the caravan routes). The building housing David’s tomb incorporates much more ancient elements. The southern wall includes stones which are quite large and obviously older than the rest of the building. Josephus reports that Herod the Great (37-4 B.C.) secretly tried to rob the treasure hidden in David’s tomb. When two of Herod’s clandestine diggers met a mysterious death, fear overcame Herod and he ordered a tomb-memorial erected at the site. Jews have streamed here for centuries to recite the Psalms written by David, whose life teaches many lessons about human nature. The tomb is covered with a velvet cloth embroidered with the words David Melech Israel Hai Vekayam, the first song many Jewish children learn, which evokes the sense that David’s spirit is still with us. Prayers at King David’s tomb also turn to Jerusalem, which David made the united capital of the tribes of Israel. The anniversary of David’s death coincides with the eve of Shavuot, when it is customary to pray and study all night at the tomb. Behind the marker of King David’s tomb, the cenotaph there used to be stairs going down to the actual burial cave. Workers were sent down to look by Rabbi Goldstein, they came up terrified saying they saw down there amazing ancient things. This area was sealed with cement by Rabbi Goldstein. Mount Zion is a hill just outside the walls of the Old City of Jerusalem. The term “Zion” became a synonym referring to the entire city of Jerusalem and the Land of Israel. There is reason to believe that in Biblical times the name Mount Zion referred to the area of what today is called the Temple Mount. However, as early as the first century the hill today called Mount Zion had acquired the name for unknown reasons. On Mount Zion is King David’s Tomb and that of the other kings of Isreal. An unexpected opportunity to investigate this building occured in 1948, during Israel’s War of Independence. A mortar shell hit the site, and Israeli archaeologist Jacob Pinkerfeld was sent to repair the damage. In the course of repairs, he removed the marble floor slabs and dug two pits revealing three earlier floors, shown in the lower left drawing. Five inches below the present floor was a 12th-century Crusader floor; 1.5 feet below that, Pinkerfeld discovered a mosaic floor with geometric designs dating to the Byzantine period (fifth century); 4 inches below the mosaic, he uncovered the remains of a Roman floor (end of the first century), consisting of plaster fragments and stones from a possible pavement. A foundation ledge projecting into the hall at this final level indicated that this earlier Roman floor was the original building’s floor. Pinkerfeld observed that the niche in the northern wall, behind the cenotaph, was Part of the original construction Standing 6 feet above the earliest floor Level, the niche resembles other niches in ancient synagogues. He noted that the niche was oriented towards the Temple Mount and concluded that the building was originally a synagogue and the niche was the aron (ark for Torah scrolls).Pinkerfeld concluded that the original building was a Roman-period synagogue or early Byzantine. . The thousand-year-old building that houses the Tomb of King David on Mount Zion in Jerusalem is almost always thronging; some have come to pray and pay homage to Israel’s famous king and ancestor of the Messiah, while others pour over sacred texts all day long in the anteroom next to the tomb. Jewish tradition has identified the tomb of King David on “Mount Zion”, a few hundred meters from the Zion Gate for more than one thousand years. The earliest mention of the Tomb of David as identified today appears in the writings of the Moslem geographer al-Makadasi, in the 10th century. However, al-Makadasi based this identification on the tradition of “the People of the Book”, that is, Jews and Christians. The first Jewish source to commit this tradition to writing is the travel diary of the “Jewish Marco Polo”, Binyamin of Tudela [1160 – 1173]. He writes Two Jewish workers employed to reconstruct a damaged monument on Mount Zion accidentally happened upon a secret passage andfound themselves in a palace made of marble columns.Within the palace was a table upon which rested a golden scepter and golden crown, with riches all around. The workers decided this was King David’s Tomb. Suddenly, they were struck down by a fierce wind and heard voices that told them to leave immediately. Three days later, the two workmen were sick in bed and could not be persuaded to return to the site.

The tomb itself is a burial cave, which is not accessible. What is accessible is a cenotaph (stone marker) over the entrance to the cave. The cenotaph is located within a complex of buildings which date to the Crusader Period [12th century], though some of the buildings were added during the Ottoman Period [16th century and later], and may have served as a caravanserai (inn for traders on the caravan routes). The building housing David’s tomb incorporates much more ancient elements. The southern wall includes stones which are quite large and obviously older than the rest of the building. Josephus reports that Herod the Great (37-4 B.C.) secretly tried to rob the treasure hidden in David’s tomb. When two of Herod’s clandestine diggers met a mysterious death, fear overcame Herod and he ordered a tomb-memorial erected at the site. Jews have streamed here for centuries to recite the Psalms written by David, whose life teaches many lessons about human nature. The tomb is covered with a velvet cloth embroidered with the words David Melech Israel Hai Vekayam, the first song many Jewish children learn, which evokes the sense that David’s spirit is still with us. Prayers at King David’s tomb also turn to Jerusalem, which David made the united capital of the tribes of Israel. The anniversary of David’s death coincides with the eve of Shavuot, when it is customary to pray and study all night at the tomb.

Behind the marker of King David’s tomb, the cenotaph there used to be stairs going down to the actual burial cave. Workers were sent down to look by Rabbi Goldstein, they came up terrified saying they saw down there amazing ancient things. This area was sealed with cement by Rabbi Goldstein.

The Sfas Emet writes that the Mishnah in Avot (3:2) states that if not for the fear of the king, every man would swallow his friends up alive. Nonetheless, if people feared HaShem there would be no need for a king. The concept of a king, is because through fearing the king one will come to fear HaShem. Thus, we see that there really is no need for a king over the people, as every man should be a king over himself. This idea is akin to what the commentators write regarding the Mishkan (tabernacle). Prior to the sin of the Golden Calf, there was no need for a Mishkan, as everyone was able to contain the Divine Presence within himself. Once the Jewish People sinned, however, they required a Mishkan as a resting place for the Divine Presence. 

King David had made music instruments that were played in the Temple his son King Salomon built. We see in  Divrei HaYamim 1(Chronicles) 28:11-13 Then David gave his son Solomon the plans for the portico of the temple, its buildings, its storerooms, its upper parts, its inner rooms and the place of atonement. He gave him the plans of all that the Spirit had put in his mind for the courts of the temple of HaShem and all the surrounding rooms, for the treasuries of the temple of God and for the treasuries for the dedicated things. He gave him instructions for the divisions of the priests and Levites, and for all the work of serving in the temple of HaShem, as well as for all the articles to be used in its service.


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HAS ANYONE EVER DISCOVERED WHAT EVER HAPPENED TO THE SLING HE KILLED GOLITH WITH ? This is very good article on our Beloved Kind David…..Thank You very mucch…

Comment by Cheri H




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